Login   /   Register   /   Lost Your Password?   /   Home
Cold Extremities in Perimenopause, Menopause & Postmenopause
Protocols for Specific Menopause Symptoms
Cold extremities are one of the symptoms associates with vasomotor instability in menopause. Other symptoms associates with vasomotor instability in menopause include hot flashes, night sweats, heart palpitations, mood changes, etc. These symptoms all occur when shifts in hormone levels affect the circulation in such a way that it no longer has the smooth and gentle tone that is required for optimal circulation.
Imbalances or poor function of estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, thyroid or insulin could each contribute in varying ways to interfering with healthy circulation and causing cold extremities. A decreased function of one or more of these hormones is associated with vasomotor symptoms, and/or altered circulation. Preserving optimal function of the circulatory system also requires healthy lifestyle and dietary habits as discussed in Hormone Health Guidelines. In most cases, women who experience cold extremities associated with menopause also experience other symptoms, which you can analyze with the Menopause Type® Questionnaire.

Treat the Cause
This protocol is designed to be personalized based on specific needs of each person. Possible causes for the vasomotor instability that contribute to cold extremities include; decreased estrogen function; decreased progesterone function & / or decreased testosterone function as outlined below. Addressing the underlying cause will relieve the additional stress on the adrenal glands, and allow it to assist the body during and after the menopause transition. Paying attention to other symptoms can reveal which hormone is not working properly, and which formulation can be used for cold extremities, as discussed below, and indicated in the following table:
Cold Extremities as Main Symptom in Menopause

Other Symptoms

Hormone

Formulation

vasomotor instability, such as hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, or sleep disruption

estrogens

EstroMend

mild vasoconstriction, such as cramping, or spasms, or even increased blood pressure

progesterone

ProgestoMend

low blood pressure, other androgen deficiency symptoms such a low blood pressure, as well as other symptoms such as depressed mood or decreased libido

testosterone

TestoGain

generalized fatigue, weight gain, cold extremities, and other symptoms associated with sub optimal thyroid function

thyroid

ThyroMend

fatigue, anxiety, or any other symptoms (including cold extremities) that worsen after a meal, or if a meal is skipped

Insulin & blood sugar

Glucobrium

Decreased Estrogen Function:
Decreased function of estrogens, with vasomotor instability is a primary cause. When there are other signs of vasomotor instability, such as hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, or sleep disruption, choose EstroMend - Vasomotor symptoms, including cold extremities, can be relieved by restoring proper function of estrogen. See more information, including references, on EstroMend.
Use customized dosage guidelines to personalize this protocol for your specific needs.

Decreased Progesterone Function:
A low progesterone function, with decreased vasodilatory affect, may predispose towards mild vasoconstriction, such as cramping, or spasms, or even increased blood pressure. When there are other signs of vasoconstriction, consider ProgestoMend, which can improve the function of progesterone, increase blood flow to the skin and has a mild vasodilating effect. See more Information, including references, on ProgestoMend. Use customized dosage guidelines to personalize this protocol for your specific needs.

Decreased Testosterone Function:
When testosterone function is decreased, there is not only a risk of vasomotor instability just as there is with estrogen deficiency, but there is also more likelihood of decreased blood flow (decreased hemodynamics), or other androgen deficiency symptoms such a low blood pressure, as well as other symptoms such as depressed mood or decreased libido. When cold extremities are also accompanied by vasomotor instability signs of decreased blood flow, choose TestoGain which supportis the ideal function of testosterone in skin which can result in decreasing vasomotor symptoms and improving blood flow. See more Information, including references, on TestoGain. Use customized dosage guidelines to personalize this protocol for your specific needs.

Decreased Thyroid Function:
When the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid, or the cells of the body do not respond to thyroid hormone as effectively as they should, generalized fatigue, weight gain, cold extremities, and other symptoms associated with sub optimal thyroid function will result. The adrenal-thyroid connection is so strong that fatigue in one will ultimately result in fatigue of the other. ThyroMendshould be used if suboptimal thyroid function is present, because in addition to supporting thyroid function, it also supports the adrenal glands. Go to the Thyroid section on this website to learn more about improving thyroid health. See more Information, including references, on ThyroMend. Use customized dosage guidelines to personalize this protocol for your specific needs.

Blood Sugar Disorders:
Feelings of fatigue, anxiety, or any other symptoms (including cold extremities) that worsen after a meal suggest that there is an unhealthy shift of blood sugar levels. Though blood sugar disorders (dysglycemias) can range from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) to high blood sugar (hyperglycemia & diabetes), all forms of blood sugar disorder should be treated seriously. The drop in blood sugar after eating is often a predecessor to insulin resistance, which eventually results to diabetes. Glucobrium should be used if fatigue occurs after eating, especially if there are blood sugar disorders in family. Use customized dosage guidelines to personalize this protocol for your specific needs.

Also Review:
Hormone Health Guidelines.
Protocols for the 12 Menopause Types® & for Specific Menopause Symptoms

Information and statements regarding products and services on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
The content is the opinion of the author, and does not represent the opinion of any other party. See Terms of Use.
If you have any questions about the Protocols or the Hormone Specific Formulations please review our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). If you have additional questions, please Contact us.